End of Year Thoughts About UX and Simplicity

Knowledge and findings of users' needs and expectation are fruitless, all too often it's just proverbial misspent seed on an arid ground, unless the ground is receptive and willing to be put under the plough.
Every time we put our fingers on the keyboard, put pen to paper, we are either creating or destroying value for users and business.



UXD is a purpose-driven, user-focused, prototype-grounded process that should achieve success through collaboration of each participant of the process eventuate in reasonable simplicity.
It's a foolish to think that the user experience and design thinking can be owned by one or a few in the process-team - it's a result of common and shared thinking and doing by each team member.

Two pertinent articles :

UX design-planning isn't an one-man-show
http://boxesandarrows.com/ux-design-planning-not-one-man-show/

Walk a while in someone else's shoes: Exploring the Role of C...s
http://ux4dotcom.blogspot.de/2010/08/walk-while-in-someone-elses-shoes.html

Simplicity is about having a deep understanding and appreciation of the users you are trying to assist, about having a great understanding of the subject matter you are trying to communicate.
Simplicity requires that you not forget your users' and business' needs, insights, purpose and aims - And by the way, that is something you should never forget, simplicity is a stated aim and targeted objective but you should also allowing complexity when it might be needed.
Simplicity depend always on the users, task, circumstances, etc. - that's pretty much the same issue as the myth of intuitive user interfaces, of which more later in an upcoming article.

Let me finish with a quote from, one of my favorite book authors, Douglas Adams:
“A common mistake that people make when trying to design something completely foolproof is to underestimate the ingenuity of complete fools.”

And now ...
Happy 2013! I wish you a beautiful, magical new year!




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